Your browser (Internet Explorer 7 or lower) is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how to update your browser.

How important is the vintage of a wine?

How important is the vintage of a wine?

The importance of vintage depends on the region of production and the quality of the wine.

The vintage date can be of critical importance in cooler, more marginal climates. If it was a good year then the wines can be dramatically better in quality compared to a year when the heavens opened at harvest time and the crop suffered from dilution and rot. Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Rhone, Champagne, Piedmont, Tuscany, parts of Germany are typically more susceptible to vintage variation. Prices can fluctuate according to the quality of the vintage, so it is important to ask a Product Consultant or check on the internet for the reviews.

In some regions there is little vintage variation because the weather is quite consistent from year to year. In hot parts of Australia and California I’m really not too worried about the vintage date, but more concerned about the maturity of the wine. That’s to say that inexpensive wines are usually best drunk young while they are fresh and fruity, whilst top quality red wines often benefit from some age.

So I would be more concerned about a wine from a lesser region, or of lesser general quality, being too old. A Chardonnay that is 5 years old from California’s Central Valley, exhibiting a worryingly deep gold color, is cause for concern. It’s an unlikely scenario though.

On a few wines there are no vintage date and so it’s not an issue. Non vintage Champagne is a classic example, and so are Ruby Ports and Sherries. This is because several vintages are blended together so the producer can achieve a degree of consistency in the house style.

Yes, it is difficult to keep up on the merits of vintages in dozens of wine regions around the world and few people have the time or inclination to stay up-to-date. But if you are buying some more expensive wine from classic areas it’s definitely worth finding out because it can mean the difference between a great bottle and a disappointment. When in doubt, turn to Wine Spectator or Decanter for reviews.

To learn more about the wonderful world of wine take a course from us at