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The Winemaker Dinner

One of the traditional ways to market and sell your wine was, and always will be, to organize a Winemaker Dinner. Essentially you try to attract a number of key customers to come and break bread with you. They taste and enjoy your wines, and you strengthen your relationship because you just fed them delectable food and poured copious quantities of expensive wines. It often ends with everyone getting inebriated and, at the end of the night, expressing their love for one-another. My company employed this tactic ALOT.

But this term “Winemaker Dinner” can be a tad misleading. Because more often than not there is no winemaker within 8,000 miles of the fancy private room at the 5 star hotel. No, YOU are playing “Winemaker” for the evening, because the real one doesn’t speak English and frankly his personality might put buyers off.

In our case we would bring vintages of all our own chateaux dating back to 1952. There would be a 20 year vertical of most estates available for tasting pre-dinner, along with a handful of the 1st growths that we brought along for prestige, and to get the most stubborn buyers to come out. And then, at dinner, we would serve 2 wines with each course, and aim for 5 courses. The wines were spectacular. Yes, we did it up real grande baby. No expense spared. My boss knew how to do it right, and when he and his gorgeous wife came on a trip it was like royalty had arrived.

The results were staggering. We created a brand image that was second to none. Buyers were impressed. One morning back in the office in Bordeaux we woke up to an 18,000 case order from our main Japanese importer, for immediate collection. So the moral of the Winemaker Dinner story is that if you are going to do it then GO BIG and make a splash, otherwise it could even work against you if Buyers are not wowed.

But no two Winemaker Dinners are ever quite alike. In London they expect someone to speak with insight and intellect, humor and quick wit, and the guests are always politely silent during the speeches. In Detroit you better make it short and sweet before the crowd starts chattering, and you can blatantly request that people fill out the order form NOW. And in Tokyo, well, you get ready for the toasts. About every 15 minutes, and with increasing frequency, someone in Japan proposes a toast. Yes darling, sometimes it’s Bottoms Up. This requires a lightening fast evaluation of the terroir expression in your glass, filled to the brim for the toast.

To call this work for some people would seem like a joke. But in fact there is a skill in the organization of a Winemaker dinner. You need to ensure the food and wine are paired well by speaking to the chef in advance and ideally sampling him on the wines and making menu suggestions. Seating arrangements must be carefully done so the biggest Buyers are made to feel important and not seated with competitors. Speeches need to be mentally prepared so they look off-the-cuff, and should be tailored to the audience and their level of knowledge, as well as the occasion. Every guest should be welcomed personally and an effort made to talk to each of them, even if it is much more tempting to stay slumped in a chair guzzling Cheval Blanc with your chatty neighbor. And inevitably you meet a dozen people so you need to scribble down what you promised them on their business card otherwise in the morning the follow-up is a disaster. Ok it wasn’t quite as elaborate as Chanel launching their Spring Collection, but a lot of work went into a successful event.

Finally, after the dinner is officially over, you must invite the stragglers to the closest bar for more wine, and more toasts. But you yourself must never totally lose the plot because you might end up having to carry your Japanese importer home. And yes, it was him with the 18,000 case order.