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What order do you serve wines in at a dinner party?

It’s best to kick off with sparkling wines, which can be sipped all by themselves or paired with light appetizers such as smoked salmon.

Following that you can move into white wines. I recommend starting with drier styles of aromatic wines like Sauvignon Blanc and then move into heavier, richer, and potentially oaked varietals such as Chardonnay.

When you start on the red wines, make sure you pour the more delicate ones first, such as Pinot Noir or Gamay. Follow the lighter reds with heavier wines that have richer and more concentrated flavors, such as an Australian Shiraz or California Zinfandel. These big reds can overpower the lighter ones and so best to work upwards in terms of body.

The debate is still out in terms of the serving order of young versus older wines. Personally, I recommend serving older wines first because they can have more delicate and complex flavors, which are harder to appreciate after a young tannic red.

Sweet wines should be next on the agenda. There are some delicious sweet wines from Sauternes, Tokaji, the Loire and Germany, not to mention Canada. The golden rule is that the wine should be sweeter than the dessert otherwise they will taste tart and sour.

Wrap up the evening with fortified wines such as a Port or Madeira. After the stronger alcoholic content of these wines it’s hard to appreciate the subtleties of the other types and styles of wine. After a glass of Port it’s hard to go back!

To learn more about the wonderful world of wine take a course from us at www.FineVintageLtd.com

What are the best white wines to buy under $20?

There are dozens of white wines under $20 that offer excellent quality for the price.

I love Sauvignon Blanc for just sipping by itself and Chile and New Zealand offer plenty of great value wines. Look for Marlborough on the label of Kiwi wines and the Casablanca valley on Chilean wines. These are the most respected regions.

The best value Rieslings come from Germany, Alsace, and Australia. Often German Rieslings can have a touch of sweetness, even at QbA level, and pair well with spicy food. Rieslings from Alsace are much drier, with crisper acidity and citrus flavors. Australians love their Rieslings too, but these can be extremely dry and only for those who like crisp, steely, austere wines.    

Pinot Grigio from Italy will usually run you less than $20 a bottle and these are easy drinking wines. They mainly come from the cooler reaches of northern Italy. They are dry, light to medium in body and always marked by crisp refreshing acidity. Try them with scallops and crab cakes, or simply on their own.

Gewurztraminer is under-rated and, as such, many of them are underpriced. It’s partly to do with the tricky pronunciation of the grape. But don’t let that put you off because these can be sublime, especially from Alsace. They can be very floral and tropical, smelling of roses and exotic fruits, and usually full bodied and heady.

When it comes to Chardonnay, look to Chile and Australia for real bargains. These are consistently well-made and economies of scale allow for attractive pricing. California is another option. If they are oaky then try them with richer foods, such as roast chicken.

The list could go on, given the multitude of other varietals lining our shelves, but we’ll leave the rest for another time. Oh, don’t forget Spanish sparkling wine, known as Cava. Now that’s a deal.

To learn more about the wonderful world of wine take a course from us at www.FineVintageLtd.com

How long can I cellar Port for?

Ports are one of the longest lived wines because they are fortified, they have the support of tannin, a degree of acidity, and massive concentration of fruit. These are some of the key criteria for longevity. In fact, other than Madeira, they are the longest lived of all wines. But there are a number of different styles of Port and so I have to answer your question according to each style.

Vintage Ports, the greatest wines from a single year, are designed for long term cellaring. The general guideline is that they should not be opened for at least a decade after the vintage, and most will be showing their pedigree at 15-25 years of age. Of course, it depends on the quality and style of the vintage, but a really great Port could easily mature for 40-50 years, and some of them for much longer.

With Vintage Port you must drink the whole bottle within 1-2 days of opening. These wines are bottled after just a few years in the cellar, so they oxidize faster because they haven’t been exposed to a lot of air. So beware of ordering Vintage Port in a restaurant. Often they have been sitting there for, well, much more than 2 days.  

Late Bottled Vintage Ports (LBV), which is the best value for money, are aged by the producer and only shipped when ready to drink. Whilst you certainly can age a top LBV for a few years, and you may even see some improvement, this is not the intention of the producer. The producers are hoping that you’ll pull the cork the day you buy them, given that they already matured them for over 6 years themselves.

Ruby Port is the entry level category, and these are intended for immediate consumption. They are deep red, full bodied, with heady black fruits, sweet spices and a fiery kick on the palate. If you age them for more than a few years they risk losing their freshness. So don’t cellar these.

Finally, Tawny Ports, which are my favourites, can be kept in bottle for a few years, depending on the quality and style of the wine. But the intention with these beauties is that you buy them and drink them without further cellaring. In production, they have been exposed to air for many years before bottling, sometimes 40+ years in the top age category. So they are more stable, and you can keep the bottle open for a few weeks, if you can resist the temptation.

To learn more about the wonderful world of wine take a course from us at www.FineVintageLtd.com

How to identify aromas and flavors in wine.

It can be tricky to pinpoint the exact flavors in some wines, and even amongst the experts there can be some disagreement because of the subjective nature of taste.

In fact, we all taste slightly differently. Some people have very low sensitivities to bitterness, others have a sweeter tooth, and different nationalities can have their own taste preferences. It’s for this reason that some wine producers make the same wine in different styles to suit certain export markets.

My recommendation would be to play blind tasting games with different fruits, spices, and other common aromas found in wine. Blindfold your partner, or have them close their eyes, and then ask them to smell different fruits and guess what they are. Then move into the spices. You’d be amazed at how often we get them wrong.

There are also aromas kits that you can buy from companies like Le Nez du Vin, but these can be very expensive and are not for everyone. Another option is to take a wine course where you are professionally trained to taste and describe wines.

The good news is that practice makes perfect. There are certainly some tasters that have an ability to write beautiful tasting notes and identify a wide range of flavors in wine. But keep in mind that this is a profession for such people and the skills didn’t develop overnight.

To learn more about the wonderful world of wine take a course from us at www.FineVintageLtd.com