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Domaine Weinbach, Grand Cru Furstentum, Vendange Tardive 2005

Gewurztraminer
Domaine Weinbach, Grand Cru Furstentum, Vendange Tardive 2005
Alsace, France

This stunning wine is made by Domaine Weinbach in Alsace, considered to be one of the finest producers of Gewurztraminer in the world.

The grapes come from a single Grand Cru vineyard called Furstentum. They are picked late in the season, when they have high levels of sugar in the berry and tropical fruit flavors have developed. This results in a sweet dessert wine, but one that is exceptionally well- balanced by the lively acidity.

On the nose, the wine is powerfully perfumed with rose petal, exotic fruits and honey notes. The palate is rich and viscous with layers of flavor that lead into a long, complex and evolving finish.

The winemaker, Catherine Faller, believes in a non-interventionist approach to creating fine wines. The secret is to harvest at the perfect moment from a top vineyard site.

Food and wine pairing: The sweet character of the wine will best suit foie gras, or sweet desserts and fresh fruit plates.

Fritz Haag, Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr, Spatlese, 2008

Riesling
Fritz Haag, Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr, Spatlese, 2008
Mosel valley, Germany

Fritz Haag is one of the iconic producers in the Mosel, with a history dating back to 1605. Indeed, fine Mosel Rieslings were once the most expensive wines in the world and Haag was at the forefront.

The company cultivates Riesling in the famous Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr vineyard, which is planted on the precipitously steep slopes of the Mosel valley.

A “Spatlese” is made from late harvest grapes, that have achieved a high level of ripeness, and so the wine is medium sweet. The nose bursts with aromatics of peaches and apricots, and shows excellent freshness and vibrancy. The palate is medium bodied, elegant and delicate, with enough acidity to counter-balance the sweetness. This wine will age for 20-30 years, but can be enjoyed now. We hope you enjoy it.

Food and wine pairing: The medium sweet character of the wine will suit spicy Indian and Asian dishes, and fresh fruit plates.

Krug, Grande Cuvee, Brut

Champagne
Krug, Grande Cuvee, Brut
France

In 1843 when Johann-Joseph Krug founded his Champagne House he had one singular goal. He wanted to produce the very finest Champagne in the region. Over 160 years later, connoisseurs agree that Krug is in a league of its own.

The style is unique and distinctive. The wine is powerful and rich, yet with a certain elegance to complement its extravagant complexity. The length of the finish lasts for minutes.

Krug is one of the few houses to ferment the base wines in oak, which gives the wine more structure and power. The richness is enhanced by the extensive use of old reserve wines in the final blend. As the wine matures for a decade before release it develops beautiful complex nuances.

Krug is an experience. It represents the ultimate in craftsmanship and dedication to quality.

Food and wine pairing: Krug is the ultimate aperitif, and a perfect complement to caviar, smoked salmon, lobster and a variety of seafood.

Kangarilla Road, 2010

Shiraz
Kangarilla Road, 2010
McLaren Vale, South Australia

McLaren Vale is perhaps the most beautiful of all the Australian wine regions as it hugs the coastline, with its kilometers of sandy beaches, just outside the city of Adelaide.

Kangarilla Road has often received scores over 90 points and critics describe it as a classic Australian Shiraz. The super-ripe grapes bask in the sun, developing intense sweet aromas of blueberry, raisin and dark chocolate.

Only a moderate amount of new oak is used, allowing the wine to display its fruit-forward style and concentrated flavors. There is lovely balance between the richness of the fruit, the crisp acidity that cuts through it, and the supple tannins that house the wine.

Food and wine pairing: The best matches are with beef, lamb and hard cheese but it can be enjoyed by itself if you like full-bodied reds.

Chateau d’Armailhac, AC Pauillac, 5th growth, 2007

Meritage blend – Cabernets and Merlot
Chateau d’Armailhac, AC Pauillac, 5th growth, 2007
Bordeaux, France

This property belongs to one of the most noble and outstanding producers in the world, the family of Baron Philippe de Rothschild, a global powerhouse best known for its flagship 1st growth, Chateau Mouton-Rothschild.

This fine red Bordeaux from the classic appellation of Pauillac is made up of 54% Cabernet Sauvignon giving backbone, tannic structure and blackberry and cedar notes. The 23% of Merlot fleshes it out, giving body, and plum and chocolate notes, and the 23% Cabernet Franc gives floral notes and added complexity.
This property is a Grand Cru Classe, and is highly regarded in the Medoc as a top performing 5th growth.

Food and wine pairing: Red meats and hard cheese are the ideal match as they compliment the tannins in the wine.

Dr. Loosen, Erdener Treppchen, Spatlese, 2011

Riesling
Dr. Loosen, Erdener Treppchen, Spatlese, 2011
Mosel valley, Germany

Ernst Loosen is the owner of a winery that can trace its history back over 200 years. This wine comes from the Treppchen vineyard, close to the town of Erden.
A “Spatlese” is made from late harvest grapes that have achieved a high level of ripeness. This, combined with the halting of the fermentation, has created a wine with a pleasant degree of sweetness.

The nose is perfumed with aromas of sweet apples, peaches and apricots, and shows excellent freshness and minerality. The palate is medium sweet, finishing slightly drier, with medium body, and enough acidity to counter-balance the sweetness. A host of stone fruit and tropical fruit flavors unravel on the palate leading into a beautiful long finish.

Food and wine pairing: The medium sweet character of the wine will suit spicy Indian and Asian dishes, and fresh fruit plates.

Selbach-Oster, Zeltinger Sonnenuhr, Spatlese, 2012

Riesling
Selbach-Oster, Zeltinger Sonnenuhr, Spatlese, 2012
Mosel Valley, Germany

Since 1660 the Selbach family has been producing some of the very finest Rieslings in the Mosel Valley. This is arguably the greatest of all the German wine regions, which is known for the incredibly steep slopes, slate soils, and wines that are capable of ageing for decades. This wine comes from the Sonnenuhr vineyard which is close to the village of Zelting.

The nose exudes intense aromatics of peach, apricot, a whiff of honey and grapey notes. On the palate the sweetness becomes evident, but the wine finishes in a drier style. There are notes of tropical fruits, honey, apricot, along with a subtle mineral character and a miniscule spritz that lifts the palate.

Food and wine pairing: The medium sweet character of the wine will suit spicy Indian and Asian dishes, and fresh fruit plates.

Tommasi, Amarone della Valpolicella Classico, 2009

Tommasi, Amarone della Valpolicella Classico, 2009
Veneto, Italy

There are a handful of Amarone producers that command international respect for their truly fine wines. Tommasi is unquestionably on that list.

Amarone is made from indigenous varieties that you don’t find elsewhere, named Corvina, Rondinella, Molinara and Corvinone. The best bunches are picked from the vine and then laid to dry on straw mats for 5 months before pressing. The tiny amount of juice extracted is deep, dark and concentrated.

The nose explodes with sweet dried fruit, with a note of raisin and dark chocolate. The palate is very full bodied, with luscious fruit sweetness, round tannins, and an aftertaste that lingers on and on. These wines can age for 30+ years.

Food and wine pairing: Grilled meats pair well. The wine is also perfect with hard cheeses as you finish your meal.

Mantlerhof, Mosburgerin, Reserve 1er Cru 2011

Gruner Veltliner
Mantlerhof, Mosburgerin, Reserve 1er Cru 2011
Niederosterreich, Austria

For over 200 years this family has farmed a small parcel of vineyards, making tiny quantities of exquisite Gruner Veltliner. This is a fantastic grape that performs best in Austria.

This famous producer prefers to remain low-key and focus their efforts more on production than marketing. This wine comes from the 1er Cru classified site Mosburgerin, a vineyard noted for its complex flavours.

The nose has a youthful freshness yet depth of aromatics. Celery, pear, citrus, minerals, pepper, and other nuances combine to create vibrancy and complexity. The palate is dry, light to medium bodied, with layers of green fruit flavours wound around the crisply acidic backbone, that leads into a beautiful long finish.

Food and wine pairing: The perfect match with spicy Asian dishes, fresh seafood, and soft cheeses.

Taittinger, Prestige Rose

Champagne
Taittinger, Prestige Rose
France

Taittinger is one of the most revered Champagne Houses. Connoisseurs adore the flagship Comtes de Champagne, perhaps the finest of all the sparkling wines made from 100% Chardonnay.

The House was started in 1734, and is family owned and operated. They have 288 hectares of vineyards, and a labyrinth of underground cellars where they slowly age their lovely wines.

The color is a pale salmon pink. A delicate stream of small bubbles rises to the surface, lifting the aromatics. Fresh raspberry, strawberry and a note of freshly baked bread entice the nose.

On the palate the wine is beautifully dry yet fruity, light and elegant in style but with intense and persistent flavors, and a gorgeous long length.

Food and wine pairing: The ultimate aperitif, and the perfect wine to pair with light seafood dishes. In France it is a popular way to end a lovely meal too.